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Interactive Data Visualization: Metropolitain

Metropolitainis a datavisualization experiment by Dataveyes
One of the most intricate and dense underground networks in Europe, the metro is a central component in the daily life of millions of Parisians. As a result, the official metro map conditions the very way commuters approach time, and space, as they tend to select their journeys based on the perceived smallest distance between two points. This visualization offers to challenge this conventional view. Metropolitain takes on an unexpected gamble: using cold, abstract figures to take the pulse of a hectic and feverish metropolis. 
You are invited to play around with two views: the projected journey time between two stations, as well as the number of people touching in at each station. The metro map is no longer arbitrarily dictated by the spatial distance between two points, but transforms along the user exploration, to reflect its actual accessibility.

This is really, really cool.

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