Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Sandy and New York's Transit System

Last night, like many of you, I watched Sandy pummel the east coast. As it descended upon New York City, twitter began to flow with pictures and stories, all of which seem to come straight out of a bad Hollywood disaster film.


Explosions, fires, wind, and flooding ravaged New York City. I cannot imagine the efforts that will be needed to clean up and get back to normal. In particular, the city's transit system seems hard hit. Salt water and subways DO NOT mix. In a city that relied heavily on its transit system, this is huge. The Atlantic points out that they've even predicted an event of this type would happen in a report that was released last year.

The researchers estimate that, after a storm of this magnitude, it could take the subway system about 21 days to get working at 90 percent functionality. If all potential damage is considered, Jacob and colleagues warn that timeline could increase to several months, and that "permanent restoration of the system to the full revenue service that was previously available could take more than two years."
MTA carries 11 million people on an average day. In a presidential election where the climate was not mentioned once, this is potentially big wake up call.

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